Soap bubbles to make invitation cards

Soap is a lot more fun than you can imagine. Use its exceptional power to create multicolor and original invitation cards by taking advantage of the science behind surfactant properties!

You will need:

From 5 years

Difficulty : easy

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Let's experiment

Pour acrylic paint in every bowls

Then add the equivalent of a tablespoon of dishwashing liquid.

Now add 50 mL of water and gently mix with a spoon.

Using a straw, blow into each bowl to create bubbles. Remember to change the straw from one bowl to another.

Now, with your sheet of paper, collect the bubbles as you would do with a spoon.

You can even pop the bubbles with your fingers.

Let’s go to create as many colored cards as you want. When you’re done, let them dry. And then use them to make original invitations for your birthday.

Surfactancy, the power of soap!

Soap is composed of molecules which are made up of a part which likes water, and another part which likes oil. Soap is said to be amphiphilic.

Without soap, you cannot make bubbles with just water. If you add soap, it is placed on the surface of the water. In this way, the part that likes water stays in contact with it, and the part that likes air (or oil), points to air.

When you blow in the colored solution with the straw, bubbles form thanks to the soap molecules which are compatible with the two media. If you could shrink to the size of the molecules, you would see that the bubble film includes water, and with it, the color that you have diluted in the bowl.

It is only when these bubbles burst that the colored water is deposited on your sheet to create pretty patterns.

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